State member for Maryborough Bruce Saunders with state ministers (L) Leeanne Enoch and Grace Grace.
State member for Maryborough Bruce Saunders with state ministers (L) Leeanne Enoch and Grace Grace. Alistair Brightman

RAIL JOBS FOCUS: MPs to hear resident concerns at forum

VISITING Queensland minister Grace Grace says job security at the Heritage City's Downer rail-yard will be a key discussion at an upcoming forum.

The Industrial Relations minister visited Maryborough on Thursday to plug the upcoming Regional Community Forum with Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch and Labor MP Bruce Saunders.

Asked how the State Government would ensure better contract continuity and avoid a fluctuating work force at the Maryborough factory, Ms Grace said she wanted to hear from the community about what needed to be done at an upcoming community forum.

"We know Downer is putting on 12 apprentices in this area,” Ms Grace said.

"We want to make sure we can sustain those 12 apprentices and the industries into the future.

"They are some of the ideas and opportunities we want to hear, how we can work closer with industry so those fluctuations don't happen.”

It follows concerns of a revolving door trend for contract workers at the rail-yard.

Mr Saunders said he had been in discussions with Transport Minister Mark Bailey and Downer about new contracts and was working to get "a constant supply of work for years to come”.

Ms Grace and Ms Enoch will participate at the Regional Community Forum in Maryborough next month.

To register, visit qld.gov.au/agregions.



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