Sunshine Coast Mum Jade Leiman couldn't imagine starting her day without a smoothie or Acai Bowl for breakfast. Picture: Lachie Millard
Sunshine Coast Mum Jade Leiman couldn't imagine starting her day without a smoothie or Acai Bowl for breakfast. Picture: Lachie Millard

Eating breakfast could be making you fat

EATING breakfast won't stop you overeating later in the day and may in fact put weight on, Australian scientists have discovered.

New research has shaken up the theory that breakfast is the most important meal of the day given it helps boost metabolism and prevents lunchtime bingeing.

Published today in the British Medical Journal, a study from Monash University shows that the daily calorie intake in people who skipped breakfast was less than those who had a regular breakfast.

But Aloysa Hourigan from Nutrition Australia told The Courier-Mail that eating breakfast is not all about weight control.

Sunshine Coast Mum Jade Leiman couldn't imagine starting her day without a smoothie or Acai Bowl for breakfast. Picture: Lachie Millard
Sunshine Coast Mum Jade Leiman couldn't imagine starting her day without a smoothie or Acai Bowl for breakfast. Picture: Lachie Millard

"People who skip breakfast are often low in calcium and struggle with concentration and energy levels. After fasting for a long period overnight, the brain and muscles need to be fed," she said.

The research team analysed the effect of regularly eating breakfast on weight change and daily energy intake, based on evidence from 13 randomised controlled trials, mainly in the US and UK, from the last 28 years.

They found that total daily energy intake was higher in groups who ate breakfast compared with those who skipped it - an average of 260 more calories consumed in a day, regardless of their usual breakfast habits. Those who skipped breakfast were on average 0.44kg lighter. They found no differences in energy expenditure.

The authors highlight that because of the varying quality of the studies, the findings should be interpreted with caution.

However they argue that "currently, the available evidence does not support modifying diets in adults to include the consumption of breakfast as a good strategy to lose weight".

Jade Leiman from the Sunshine Coast is one always eats breakfast.

"I think it is the most important meal as it gets me going for the day," she said.

"It is about my wellbeing. If I start my day eating something healthy, it makes me feel energised. But I think it does lessen my hunger at lunchtime too."



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