Maryborough's rural fire services likely to be combined

MARYBOROUGH'S two rural fire services offices will likely be merged, with the potential loss of two jobs.

The merger was recommended in the Malone Review into rural fire services five months ago, but had been delayed until the release of the Keelty Review on Tuesday.

The release has opened the way to finish implementing recommendations in the Malone report, as well as instigating major changes across emergency services.

On Wednesday, a representataive for Police and Community Safety Minister Jack Dempsey could not say whether the merger of the regional and area office would definitely go ahead, but said there was no longer any impediments on going forward with the Malone recommendations.

"We have already begun implementing some of the 91 recommendations from the Malone Report and all were accepted in principle pending outcome of Keelty," the representative said.

"Now with a full understanding of the Keelty Review, on the surface there doesn't seem to be many impediments to continuing the implementation of Mr Malone's recommendations."

This Keelty review will also see major changes for staff at Maryborough Correctional Centre and the Fraser Coast's ambulance stations.

The 361-page report included more than 120 recommendations to streamline and share responsibilities across Queensland's emergency services, including police and fire.

From October, Queensland Ambulance Service will be part of Queensland Health.

Queensland Health did not answer questions yesterday on whether the Fraser Coast's ambulance service would now become part of the Wide Bay Hospital and Health Services budget.

Mr Dempsey's office said day-to-day operations at Fraser Coast ambulance stations would not change.

A QHealth spokesperson said Queensland Ambulance Service would retain a separate identity when it transitions to the new department.

The full Keelty Review report can be read at cabinet.qld.gov.au.

Keelty Review highlights

In general

  • We observed on occasions that the system works well almost in spite of itself. - page 11
  • The review team has formed the view that portfolio agencies operate in silos, often in counterproductive ways that push resource consumption and time delays into other parts of the system's value chain. - page 17

Fire service

  • The Queensland Fire and Rescue Service spends little time actually extinguishing fires. - page 29
  • QFRS is sometimes seen to be "doing its own thing" rather than being a team player which is likely reflected in its relationship with the Rural Fire Service, volunteers and other stakeholders. - page 31

Police

  • The review team has been concerned by the extent to which the Queensland Police Service lags behind other jurisdictions in terms of its information and communication technology approach. - page 18
  • If police wish to call the report in from the incident scene, they may need to use the complainant's own phone to dial in and register the details of the matter. - page 18

Prisons

  • Prisoner transports and police watch house operations should be considered for outsourcing. - page 35
  • There needs to be clear delineation between the Queensland Police Service and Queensland Corrective Services for maintaining integrity and good governance. - page 78

Ambulance

  • 83.3% (833,243 in 2011-12) of Queensland Ambulance Service incident responses interfaced with Queensland Health. - page 33
  • The review team also strongly supports the notion that the Queensland Ambulance Service retains its identity and not be fully absorbed into the Health portfolio. - page 33.


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