Parkhurst State School students Jackson Hickey, left, Teah Keen and Kenya Nebauer with Principal Lyle Walker and head of curriculum Moira Mackenzie embrace technology at their school.
Parkhurst State School students Jackson Hickey, left, Teah Keen and Kenya Nebauer with Principal Lyle Walker and head of curriculum Moira Mackenzie embrace technology at their school. Sharyn O'Neill

School a technology trailblazer

PARKHURST State School is poised to deliver Australia's next generation of whiz kids after it was recognised by Microsoft as a technology trailblazer.

Microsoft awarded Parkhurst “Pathfinder” status earlier this month, just one of 54 schools worldwide and the only primary school in Australia.

It recognises the school as a model of integrated and innovative teaching which can influence other schools to become leaders in integrated learning.

Parkhurst had to demonstrate strong vision for how it would like to transform its learning environment and enthusiasm for collaborating with other educators.

Principal Lyle Walker and head of curriculum Moira Mackenzie travelled yesterday to South Africa for the Microsoft Worldwide Innovative Education Forum.

Five hundred educators from around the world will gather at the forum to meet and share their experiences and design new teaching tools.

Year 6/7 teacher Venetta Jones said staff, students and parents were very excited about the award, which put the school at the forefront of new learning techniques.

Ms Jones said the y tried to incorporate technology in lessons daily and students were already adept at navigating gaming devices, green screens and programs such as Songsmith in the music department.

The students get out and use flip cameras as well as video when doing assignments and tasks. She said these tools kept the students engaged.

“The kids love it. Their behaviour management is zero and they respect the technology,” she said.

Parkhurst has 250 students.



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