Albert Proud (right) catches the opposition in possession during a Round 4 AFL match between the Brisbane Lions and the Western Bulldogs.
Albert Proud (right) catches the opposition in possession during a Round 4 AFL match between the Brisbane Lions and the Western Bulldogs. PATRICK HAMILTON

'Talent outspeaks the law, it seems': letter

IN A sports-addicted nation like ours, those stars who demonstrate anti-social and immoral behaviour in public are often forgiven and treated lightly because of their talents and prowess in their sporting culture.

They are the role models for many up-and-coming generations of hero- worshippers.

Alcohol and drug abuse is also rife in sports.

However, talent is often the get-out-of-jail-free card, which the rest of the nation has to tolerate in many incidents of sporting boys behaving badly in public, away from the sports arena.

Ben Cousins is one and Albert Proud is now the headline for all the wrong reasons. Blaming his addiction is intolerable, when domestic and relationship violence is at epidemic proportions in our nation.

Taking personal responsibility for one's anti-social and even criminal behaviour seems to be forgotten, when sentencing these people for crimes for which the rest of the community pays heavily.

Leniency is handed out to the infamous, with promises they will be rehabilitated, yet falling again by the wayside when it comes to the test.

Those who put their faith and trust in well-meaning magistrates to deal justly with perpetrators, are left dumbfounded, when victims find offenders are given chances again and again, because of their minders vouching for them.

They have vested interests in keeping their protégés in action.

These are highly paid sports stars drawing large crowds, without regard for their failure to keep the laws which govern our society. Given too much attention and money too soon, seems to go to their heads.

The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour.

The poor girl at the centre of the Albert Proud incident, beaten to within an inch of her life, on life-support, supposedly his partner, has been betrayed not only by him, but by the courts which are allowing this man to escape punishment befitting the crime: 5.5 years and out in just over one.

We have a crisis in our society, of relationship violence and addictions undermining the very fabric of our society. Talent speaks louder than commonsence and the law, apparently.

E ROWE,

Marcoola



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