Marjorie Cheek's father's war medals survived the Blue Mountains bush fires after her nephew's house was destroyed by fire and she wants to wear them to the 2015, 100th anniversary Gallipoli celebrations. Marjorie with a photo of her father from Gallipoli.
Marjorie Cheek's father's war medals survived the Blue Mountains bush fires after her nephew's house was destroyed by fire and she wants to wear them to the 2015, 100th anniversary Gallipoli celebrations. Marjorie with a photo of her father from Gallipoli. Warren Lynam

Tears of joy for Marjorie after news she's off to Gallipoli

MARJORIE Cheek admits to crying when she heard the news she will take her place next year at the 100th commemoration of the Gallipoli landing at Anzac Cove in Turkey.

Her application was one of just 3000 tickets issued to Australians for the official service. Each allows the recipient and a partner to attend.

Marjorie's late father Erskine Edward May was a member of the 13th Battalion that landed at Anzac Cove on April 25, 1915, the start of bloody and prolonged battle that for many represents the forging of Australia's nationhood.

"I couldn't stop crying from happiness,'' Mrs Cheek said of her reaction to the news that she and her husband Bob would be part of the service.

"I'll have to stay alive now. I'll be 89 when we go across.''

Mrs Cheek, who has been in poor health, said she was now getting better and looking forward to the journey.

Recipients of invitations to take part in the 100th commemorative service will have to fund their own travel and accommodation arrangements.

That is not an issue for the Cheeks whose daughter works as a travel agent.

Erskine Edward May was a member of the 13th Battalion that landed at Anzac Cove on April 25, 1915.
Erskine Edward May was a member of the 13th Battalion that landed at Anzac Cove on April 25, 1915. Warren Lynam

Erskine May survived the war to return to Sydney where he worked as a carpenter, ending his career with the City of Sydney as clerk of works.

He died at 75-years of age in 1969.

Turkish officials announced last year that numbers at the Anzac Cove ceremony would be capped at 10,500.

Of those 8000 were allocated to Australia, 2000 for New Zealanders and the remainder between Turkish representatives and officials of nations involved in the Gallipoli campaign.

The age of the selected Australian applicants ranges from 16 to 99 years.

People who missed out on tickets to Gallipoli are being encouraged to consider attending a service on August 6 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Lone Pine, one of the most significant battles of the Turkish campaign.
 



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