Butchulla elder Aunty Karen Hall assists Carramar Community Kindergarten student Noah Yeates with his handprint on the mural she created that will become part of a fire circle for the centre.
Butchulla elder Aunty Karen Hall assists Carramar Community Kindergarten student Noah Yeates with his handprint on the mural she created that will become part of a fire circle for the centre. Boni Holmes

Traditional teachings

TELLING stories through pictures is an age old tradition which Butchulla elder Aunty Karen Hall loves to teach.

Carramar Community Kindergarten staff invited Aunty Karen to help educate their children with art and language.

Teacher Katie Johanssesen said they were trying to make our environment more inclusive.

"We want to include the local Butchulla traditions into our kindergarten and have already started incorporating Butchulla language classes," she said.

Aunty Karen has been painting a mural which will be a feature wall for the yarning and fire circles the kindy is building.

The Butchulla elder's painting started as a Reconciliation mural but now ties in with the kindy's plans.

"I decided with the campfire, Aboriginal warriors dancing in the flames and around the outside we have Aboriginal symbols."

 

Butchulla elder Aunty Karen Hall signs her artwork with the traditional handprint. The mural will become part of a fire circle for the Carramar Community Kindergarten.
Butchulla elder Aunty Karen Hall signs her artwork with the traditional handprint. The mural will become part of a fire circle for the Carramar Community Kindergarten. Boni Holmes

As an early educator, Aunty Karen said the generic symbols were so children can look at other paintings and recognise these symbols and what they are.

Leaving her handprint signature on the mural is tradition she has adopted.

"The children have also put their handprints on them to say yes we were here too," Aunty Karen said.

Ms Johanssesen said the the space they were creating was where we can sit and tell stories.

"It is a space where we discuss different issues we are having - same kind of way the Aboriginal people did many years ago and still do today," she said.

She said they received a grant through the Office of Early Childhood to help them include more local history.

"I am amazed at how quickly the children have picked it up.

"We are just try to involve community more and showing our respect for the Butchulla people."

DETAILS

For more information visit Carramar Community Kindergarten, 326 Alice St, Maryborough or their Facebook page or phone 4121 2115.



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