Indian myna birds, known by some as the cane toads of the skies, are the subject of a survey by the council.
Indian myna birds, known by some as the cane toads of the skies, are the subject of a survey by the council.

Under myna attack from human threat

THE indian myna bird's Wide Bay future is in limbo with a new campaign under way by those wanting the pest gone.

Bundaberg Regional Council recently announced a $2 bounty for each bird caught alive and it appears that decision is attracting attention in other parts of Queensland.

Not least in the Fraser Coast, where some people see this as the perfect opportunity for local government to act and stop a problem that has the potential to escalate.

One such person is conservationist and TESS Wildlife Sanctuary curator Ray Revill, who believes action must be taken now to eradicate the cane toads of the skies and protect native fauna and flora.

"My opinion is if they can nip it in the bud before it progresses too quickly now it will make the situation easier in the long run," Mr Revill said.

"If we can control them now in the Bay and in our region the better off we will be."

Should the council put a bounty on indian myna birds?

This poll ended on 16 October 2012.

Current Results

Yes

89%

No

8%

Unsure

1%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Fraser Coast Mayor Gerard O'Connell agreed the birds were already on the Fraser Coast and suggested council had asked residents last year to take part in a survey to map the distribution of the birds across the region.

He told the Chronicle he was aware of Bundaberg's program and agreed it might have merit.

"The introduction of a bounty to control Indian Myna birds is an interesting concept," Cr O'Connell said.

"It will be interesting to see how the program goes towards controlling the birds."

Cr O'Connell also mentioned that a second survey was scheduled to take place in the next few weeks, to investigate whether the birds were spreading or had colonised distinct areas.

He said most reported bird sightings were along the Hervey Bay Esplanade with a few at River Heads, Sunshine Acres, near the Maryborough airport and Tiaro.



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