Impossible Foods - the Silicon Valley-based company behind the world’s most-hyped meat-free beef burger - is eyeing off an Aussie expansion.
Impossible Foods - the Silicon Valley-based company behind the world’s most-hyped meat-free beef burger - is eyeing off an Aussie expansion.

World’s most-hyped plant burger set for Australia expansion

The company behind the most-hyped plant-based burger in the world is planning to expand its empire by serving up its meatless burgers in Australia.

Silicon Valley-based Impossible Foods burst onto the meat-free scene in 2016 when it launched the Impossible Burger with Burger King - taking it from a little known start up to a kingpin in the meatless industry.

The company today revealed at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that it was adding plant-based pork to its menu - joining beef as the company's second meat-free variety.

It also unveiled the Impossible sausage which will be served up as a breakfast sandwich at Burger Kings around the US.

Impossible Foods chief financial officer David Lee said the company decided to opt for pork as its second plant-based meat variety ahead of chicken, steak, cheese and even egg because it was the most served meat in the world - particularly in Asian countries.

Impossible Foods reveals its latest meat-free variety - pork. Photo: Tanya French
Impossible Foods reveals its latest meat-free variety - pork. Photo: Tanya French

'That was a big part of the reason (for choosing pork), when you look at how much is being consumed in Asia with dumplings etc,' said Mr Lee.

And with Australia's rapid adoption of plant-based lifestyles, Mr Lee confirmed to News Corp Australia the company had its sight set on Australian consumers.

"There are plans to be global. I can confirm Australia is absolutely one of the markets we are interested in entering," he said.

"Australia is a critical country, especially given its proximity to Asia."

Mr Lee said the company had been inundated with interest from Australian distributors eager to stock the product.

The fake pork is set to be a hit worldwide - particularly in Asia. Photo: Tanya French
The fake pork is set to be a hit worldwide - particularly in Asia. Photo: Tanya French

There's no word yet on exactly when Impossible Foods will hit Australian shores but Mr Lee said it would look to partner with a major brand and have a 'bespoke tailored' offering - just as it did with Burger King in the US - to ensure maximum impact when it enters the Australian market.

Despite supermarket shelves increasingly stocking wide varieties of meat-less meat and Burger King's Australian offshoot Hungry Jacks already launching the plant-based Rebel Whooper, Mr Lee said Impossible Foods wasn't worried about the competitive Australian market.

'Our competitive advantage is our brand and our technology," he said.

'95 per cent of our consumers are hard core meat eaters.

'For us, it is about more and more meat eaters choosing Impossible Foods.'

Impossible Foods debuted its new pork offering to journalists at CES in Las Vegas today serving up pork bahn mi, char siu buns, dan dan noodles, pork katsu, pork shumai and pork sweet, sour and numbing meatballs.

Impossible Pork is made from similar ingredients to its ground beef product which includes soy protein, sunflower oil and coconut oil.

The food is produced without any animal hormones or antibiotics and contains 0mg cholesterol.

Mr Lee said its development team was churning out up to 100 prototypes of other meat alternatives, flagging the company's mission that it won't stop until animals never have to be used in the 'meat' industry.



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